Only Murders In The Building Explores Its Newest Victim’s

But Bunny isn’t there to crack down on them, instead offering a fancier bottle of champagne than the one Mabel had bought. Oliver, in return, hands Bunny the very same tie-dye hoodie sweatshirt that we saw her wearing in the first-season finale, encouraging her to don it in front of them. And after her kind peace offering, what do the podcasters do? Well … close the door on her, even though it is painfully obvious that she wants to hang out with someone. “Only Murders” here is digging into one of the great dark-comedy sitcom tropes, which is having the audience look in at the main characters from a different point of view, so that we can get a better sense that the core group can seem like a flock of idiots and/or jerks from the outside in.

It’s as much a testament to Houdyshell’s performance as to the writing, but this episode does such a good job of humanizing Bunny — simply because we get to see her from her perspective, not from that of Oliver, Mabel, and Charles — that it’s genuinely nasty (if not intentionally so) that we now see the main trio realize Bunny wanted to “join” them, and that she’s still outside the door, eventually sobbing loudly. Of course, as soon as they open the door to awkwardly let her in, Bunny has vanished and so our trio decides … to go to the roof to party.

“There’s a chance we could’ve saved her life with a simple act of kindness,” Charles intones on the podcast, and I think it’s more than a chance, Charles! As the main trio rides up to the roof, we see a mysterious figure — only spotted via their black shoes and long pants — exit the other elevator and head to Bunny’s apartment. (It’s in her apartment, as she watches an old film noir, that we gather how Mrs. Gambolini knew the phrase “I know who did it” — the line is from that movie.) Bunny clearly knows her killer, greeting them with a confused “What the f**k do you want?” before being stabbed and eventually stumbling into Mabel’s arms.

“The Last Day of Bunny Folger” offers both some valuable information and an excellent central performance from Jayne Houdyshell. If anything, the episode makes it clear that our podcasting trio really has even less clue this time around about what’s happening than they did with Tim Kono. At least Mabel was close to Tim Kono, but as guilty as she, Oliver, and Charles feel (and should feel) about how they treated Bunny in what turned out to be a few of her final moments, they’ve yet to learn about Bunny’s mysterious dining partner at the Pickle Diner – a safe bet for the same person who killed her, one imagines – or the significance of the painting to those involved. Could it be Nina? The clear answer is yes, in that anything is possible. But her pregnancy seems like a deal-breaker, though she’s quite obviously ruthless. My thought here is that we should consider the possibility that the culprit is more than one person. Could it be that, similar to something like Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Orient Express”, multiple people wanted Bunny gone and conspired to get her out of the picture? I would not be surprised.

OTHER THOUGHTS

— “Not the slapping one.” Kind of a shame we only got to see Selena Gomez tease a Cher-like ability to slap someone and shout “Snap out of it!”

— “You are the most difficult animal I have ever directed, and I did a production of ‘The Elephant Man’ with a real elephant!” Of course you did, Oliver.

— “For a while, I thought you were the killer because Tim was behind in his building fees, and I distrust women in positions of power.” Oh boy, Marv.